Glossary

http://www.gw.govt.nz/glossary

Glossary

Click on a word in the following list to see its definition.

Agrichemical

Agrichemical is defined in the Regional Air Quality Management Plan as: Any substance, whether inorganic or organic, manufactured or naturally occurring, modified or in its original state, that is used in any agriculture, horticulture, forestry, management of public amenity areas, or related activity, to eradicate, or control flora or fauna. Fertilisers are explicitly excluded from this definition.

Appeal

Appeal is not defined in the Resource Management Act or any regional plan. A provision in a plan is said to be under "appeal" if a person has referred the Council's decision on that provision to the Environment Court. The appeal can only be made after the statutory process of public submissions and hearings and can only relate to a provision that the person has made a submission about. Changes to the appealed provision can only be made by the Environment Court.

Area 1 (Regional Soil Plan)

Area 1 is defined in the Regional Soil Plan as: the area of land within the Wellington Regional Council's jurisdiction that extends: East of the Ruamahanga River to the east coast; and West of State Highway 1 to the west coast, north of Pukerua Bay.

Area 2 (Regional Soil Plan)

Area 2 is defined in the Regional Soil Plan as: that area of land within the Wellington Regional Council's jurisdiction where: The eastern boundary is the Ruamahanga River; and The western boundary is the west coast south of Pukerua Bay and State Highway 1 north of Pukerua Bay.

Artificial watercourse

Artificial watercourse is defined in the Regional Freshwater Plan as: does not include a river but has the same meaning as in the interpretation of "river" in the Act. For the purpose of Rules 9A and 9B, artificial watercourse includes an irrigation canal, water race, and farm drainage canal. The meaning of artificial watercourse was inserted by decisions on Plan change 1 to the Regional Freshwater Plan December 2002.

Assessment of effects on the environment

Schedule 4 of the Resource Management Act 1991 is: ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTS ON THE ENVIRONMENT 1. Matters that should be included in an assessment of effects on the environment – Subject to the provisions of any policy statement or plan, an assessment of effects on the environment for the purposes of section [88] should include – (a) A description of the proposal. (b) Where it is likely that an activity will result in any significant adverse effect on the environment, a description of any possible alternative locations or methods for undertaking the activity. (c) Repealed. (d) An assessment of the actual or potential effect on the environment of the proposed activity. (e) Where the activity includes the use of hazardous substances and installations, an assessment of any risks to the environment which are likely to arise from such use. (f) Where the activity includes the discharge of any contaminant, a description of – (i) The nature of the discharge and the sensitivity of the proposed receiving environment to adverse effects; and (ii) Any possible alternative methods of discharge, including discharge into any other receiving environment. (g) A description of the mitigation measures (safeguards and contingency plans where relevant) to be undertaken to help prevent or reduce the actual or potential effect. (h) An identification of those persons interested in or affected by the proposal, the consultation undertaken, [if any,] and any response to the views of those consulted. (i) Where the scale or significance of the activity’s effect are such that monitoring is required, a description of how, once the proposal is approved, effects will be monitored and by whom. 2. Matters that should be considered when preparing an assessment of effects on the environment – Subject to the provisions of any policy statement or plan, any person preparing an assessment of the effects on the environment should consider the following matters: (a) Any effect on those in the neighbourhood and, where relevant, the wider community including any socio-economic and cultural effects. (b) Any physical effect on the locality, including any landscape and visual effects. (c) Any effect on ecosystems, including effects on plants or animals and any physical disturbance of habitats in the vicinity. (d) Any effect on natural and physical resources having aesthetic, recreational, scientific, historical, spiritual, or cultural, or other special value for present or future generations. (e) Any discharge of contaminants into the environment, including any unreasonable emission of noise and options for the treatment and disposal of contaminants. (f) Any risk to the neighbourhood, the wider community, or the environment through natural hazards or the use of hazardous substances or hazardous installations.

Asset

A useful or valuable structure or material that is valued by Greater Wellington such as rock lining material, bridges, roads, debris fences etc. A community can also have assets such as businesses, recreational areas and heritage sites.

Bank-edge protection

Protection measures carried out on the river bank to prevent erosion of the bank by the flow of the river. They include rock linings, vegetation buffers and groynes and protect flood defences such as stopbanks from erosion.

Beach recontouring

Beach recontouring is defined in the Regional Freshwater Plan as: means disturbance of any river bed by the mechanical movement of sand, shingle, rock, gravel or other natural material, to realign that part of the bed that is not covered by water at the time of the disturbance for the purpose of remedying or mitigating the adverse effects of flooding or erosion. The meaning of beach recontouring was inserted by decisions on Plan Change 1 to the Regional Freshwater Plan December 2002.

Bed

Bed is defined in the Resource Management Act as: (a) In relation to any river - (i) For the purposes of esplanade reserves, esplanade strips, and subdivision, the space of land which the waters of the river cover at its annual fullest flow without overtopping its banks: (ii) In all other cases, the space of land which the waters of the river cover at its fullest flow without overtopping its banks; and (b) In relation to any lake, except a lake controlled by artificial means, - (i) For the purposes of esplanade reserves, esplanade strips, and subdivision, the space of land which the waters of the lake cover at its annual highest level without exceeding its margin: (ii) In all other cases, the space of land which the waters of the lake cover at its highest level without exceeding its margin; and (c) In relation to any lake controlled by artificial means, the space of land which the waters of the lake cover at its maximum permitted operating level; and (d) In relation to the sea, the submarine areas covered by the internal waters and the territorial sea.

Bed recontouring

Bed recontouring is defined the Regional Freshwater Plan as: means disturbance of any river bed by the mechanical movement of sand, shingle, rock, gravel or other natural material, to realign that part of the bed that is covered by water at the time of the disturbance for the purpose of remedying or mitigating the adverse effects of flooding or erosion. The meaning of bed recontouring was inserted by decisions on Plan Change 1 to the Regional Freshwater Plan December 2002.

Berm

Low lying flat land adjacent to the river bank. Berms are a natural extension to the main channel and carry water during small floods.

Bore

Bore is defined in the Regional Freshwater Plan as: any hole, regardless of the method of formation, that has been constructed to provide access to groundwater, or which intercepts groundwater in an aquifer, excluding geotechnical investigation bores other than in the Lower Hutt Groundwater Zone shown in Figure 9.3a of Appendix 9. The meaning of bore was substituted for the original meanings by decisions on Plan Change 1 to the Regional Freshwater Plan December 2002.

Bulk earthworks

Bulk earthworks is defined in the Regional Freshwater Plan as: the cut to fill, excavation, and blading required to regrade an area. This definition was added by Change 1 to the Regional Freshwater Plan, notified on 9 February 2002. The meaning of bulk earthworks was inserted by decisions on Plan Change 1 to the Regional Freshwater Plan December 2002.

Catchment

The surrounding area draining to a river. It always relates to a particular location and may include the catchments of tributary streams as well as the main river.

Clean ballast water

Clean ballast water is defined in the Resource Management (Marine Pollution) Regulations 1998 as: ballast water and contaminants carried in a tank used to carry a noxious liquid substance or oil, (a) Where the tank has been thoroughly cleaned since last used to carry a noxious liquid substance, and the residue from that cleaning discharged with the tank being emptied; or (b) Where the tank has been thoroughly cleaned since last used to carry oil and the ballast water and contaminants, when discharged, would not contain oil exceeding 15 parts per million.

Cleanfill

Cleanfill is defined in the Regional Plan for Discharges to Land and the Regional Air Quality Management Plan as: materials such as clay, soil, rock, concrete, or brick, that are free of combustible or putrescible components or hazardous substances or materials likely to create a hazardous leachate by means of biological or chemical breakdown.

Coastal marine area

Coastal marine area is defined in the Resource Management Act as: the foreshore, seabed, and coastal water, and the air space above the water - (a) Of which the seaward boundary is the outer limits of the territorial sea: (b) Of which the landward boundary is the line of mean high water springs, except that where that line crosses a river, the landward boundary at that point shall be whichever is the lesser of - (i) One kilometre upstream from the mouth of the river; or (ii) The point upstream that is calculated by multiplying the width of the river mouth by 5. Explanation (not part of the definition) The coastal marine area is all the land and water on the seaward side of the line of mean high water springs out to a distance of 12 nautical miles. The line of mean high water springs is the average of the high tides that happen just after every new moon and every full moon. You can often recognise it by a line of seaweed and driftwood on the beach. Twelve nautical miles is 22.2 kilometres. The coastal marine area extends up rivers for a distance of one kilometre or five times the width of the river, whichever is less. The coastal marine area boundaries for major rivers in the Region are defined in maps in both the Regional Coastal Plan and the Regional Freshwater Plan.

Coastal permit

Coastal permit is defined in the Resource Management Act as: A consent to do something in a coastal marine area that otherwise would contravene any of section 12, 14, and 15.

Coastal water

Coastal water is defined in the Resource Management Act as: seawater within the outer limits of the territorial sea and includes - (a) Seawater with a substantial fresh water component; and (b) Seawater in estuaries, fiords, inlets, harbours, or embayments.

Contaminant

Contaminant is defined in the Resource Management Act as: including any substance (including gases, liquids, solids, and micro-organisms) or energy (excluding noise) or heat, that either by itself or in combination with the same, similar, or other substances, energy, or heat - (a) When discharged into water, changes or is likely to change the physical, chemical, or biological condition of water; or (b) When discharged onto or into land or into air, changes or is likely to change the physical, chemical, or biological condition of the land or air onto or into which it is discharged.

Contaminated site

Contaminated site is defined in the Regional Plan for Discharges to Land as: means a site at which hazardous substances occur at concentrations above background levels and where assessment indicates it poses or is likely to pose an immediate or long term hazard to human health or the environment.

Controlled activity

Controlled activity is defined in the Resource Management Act as: means an activity described in section 77B(2). Section 77B(2) of the Resource Management Act is - "If an activity is described in this Act, regulations, or a plan or proposed plan as a controlled activity, - (a) a resource consent is required for the activity, and the consent authority has no power to decline that resource consent; and (b) the consent authority must specify in the plan or proposed plan matters over which it has reserved control; and c) the consent authority's power to impose conditions on the resource consent is restricted to the matters that have been specified under paragraph (b); and (d) the activity must comply with the standards, terms, or conditions, if any, specified in the plan or proposed plan." Explanation (not part of the definition) A resource consent is required for these activities and the Plan sets out the information required with the application. The Council must grant applications for controlled activities if the activity complies with standards and terms specified in the rule. The Council can only attach conditions to the consent about matters over which it has retained control.

Cumec

A cumec measures water flow. 1 cumec equals 1 cubic metre of water passing a given point every second. For example, a 2800 cumec flood in the Hutt River is equal to a rare event. It has less than a 0.1% chance of being equalled or exceeded in any one year.

Debris fence

A fence constructed of rail irons, posts or other materials with cable strung between them to prevent debris from floods being washed up on the sides of the river and into nearby properties.

Defence against water

Defence against water is defined in the Regional Freshwater Plan as: includes any dam, weir, bank, carriageway, or groyne, or reservoir, and any structure or appliance of whatsoever kind which has or may have the effect of stopping, diverting, controlling, restricting, or otherwise regulating the flow or spread or subsidence, in or out of a watercourse, of water including floodwater. The meaning of defence against water was inserted by decisions on Plan Change 1 to the Regional Freshwater Plan December 2002.

Discharge

Discharge is defined in the Resource Management Act as: includes emit, deposit, and allow to escape.

Discretionary activity

Discretionary activity is defined in the Resource Management Act 1991 as: means an activity described in section 77B(4) Section 77B(4) of the Resource Management Act 1991 is: If an activity is described in this Act, regulations, or a plan or proposed plan as a discretionary activity - (a) a resource consent is required for the activity; and (b) the consent authority may grant the resource consent with or without conditions or decline the resource consent; and (c) the activity must comply with the standards, terms, or conditions, if any, specified in the plan or proposed plan. Explanation (not part of the definition) A resource consent is required for these activities and the Plan sets out the information required with the application. The Council has the discretion to grant the consent and impose conditions, or decline the application.

Dry abrasive blasting

Dry abrasive blasting is defined in the Regional Air Quality Management Plan as: abrasive blasting involving the use of abrasive substances such as sand, lead shot, etc.

Effect

Effect is defined in the Resource Management Act as: Meaning of “effect” In this Act, unless the context otherwise requires, the term effect… includes – (a) Any positive or adverse effect; and (b) Any temporary or permanent effect; and (c) Any past, present, or future effect; and (d) Any cumulative effect which arises over time or in combination with other effects- Regardless of the scale, intensity, duration, or frequency of the effect, and also includes- (e) Any potential effect of high probability; and (f) Any potential effect of low probability which has high potential impact.

En route

En route is defined in the Resource Management (Marine Pollution) Regulations1998 as means that a ship is under way at sea on a course, or courses.

Environment Court

The Environment Court is established by the Resource Management Act as follows: The Environment Court is a specialist court administered by the Ministry of Justice. Environment Court proceedings are heard by an Environment Judge (who is also a District Court Judge) and two Environment Commissioners. The Environment Court has authority to: Decide on appeals arising out of resource consent applications and decisions on proposed regional plans or changes to regional plans. Make declarations about the legal status of environmental activities. Deal with enforcement proceedings, such as appeals against abatement notices or prosecutions for offences under the Resource Management Act.

Environmental strategy

Environmental strategies set out the long-term vision for developing and managing the river environment. The strategy provides concept plans and identifies opportunities to enhance the river environments. Potential opportunities range from improving areas for passive recreation, to developing indigenous ecological habitats.

Erosion

The wearing away of the earth's surface by any natural process. In flood events unstable banks can be susceptible to erosion by the fast flowing water.

Erosion prone land

Erosion Prone Land is defined in the Regional Soil Plan as: any land within Area 1 (see definition) with a slope greater than 23 degrees; and any land within Area 2 (see definition) with a slope greater than 28 degrees. Slope is the angle from horizontal and is measured in degrees to an accuracy no less than that achieved by a hand-held inclinometer or abney level.

External Sound Insulation Level (DnT,w + Ctr)

External Sound Insulation Level (DnT,w + Ctr) is defined in the Regional Coastal Plan as: means the standardised level difference (outdoor to indoor) and is a measure of the airborne sound insulation provided by the external building envelope (including windows, walls, ceilings and floors where appropriate) described using DnT,w + Ctr as defined in the following Standards: ISO717-1:1996[1] Acoustics – Rating of Sound Insulation in Buildings & Building Elements using spectrum No.2 (A-weighted traffic noise spectrum). ISO 140-5:1998 Acoustics - Measurement of Sound Insulation in Buildings and of Building Elements ?Part 5: Field Measurements of Airborne Sound Insulation of Facade Elements and Facades. The term “external sound insulation level” is used in this Plan primarily as a calculated value to demonstrate compliance with the stated minimum standard of acoustic isolation against sounds arising from outside the building. If field testing of built structures is employed to verify predictions these tests shall be carried out using ISO 140-5:1998 Acoustics – Measurement Of Sound Insulation In Buildings Of Building Elements. Part 5: Field Measurements Of Airborne Sound Insulation Of Façade Elements And Facades.

Share this