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Cholecalciferol

http://www.gw.govt.nz/cholecalciferol

Cholecalciferol

Updated 12 April 2018 11:28am

Vitamin D3 poison - Decal and Feracol

Greater Wellington uses two forms of cholecalciferol poison for possum control; trade names – Decal and Feracol.

Decal is in a cereal pellet form dyed green. The pellets are either placed loose inside a bait station and/or packaged into plastic bags weighing 30grams placed inside a bait station. All bait and bait stations are attached to trees, out of the reach of domestic and farm animals. Bait weighing 30g is one lethal dose for a possum.


Decal bait bag 30g and Decal pellets loose

Decal bait bag 30g and Decal pellets loose

 

Feracol is a peanut based paste bait dyed blue/green. Feracol Strikers are 18g of Feracol packaged into a potato starch bait station and are attached to trees.

 

18gm Feracol Striker

18gm Feracol Striker

 

Warning signs will be erected at all main access points where cholecalciferol bait stations are placed.

Cholecalciferol poison breaks down on contact with soil, light and heat and is virtually insoluble in water. It has a low toxicity to birds, and is of low secondary poisoning risk. It is non-persistent in livestock.

Warning signs will be erected at all main access points where cholecalciferol bait stations are placed.

Precautions

  • Children should be kept away from areas where cholecalciferol is
  • Don't handle bait, bait stations, or bait bags
  • Don't handle dead possums or rats
  • Don't let dogs scavenge animal carcasses

Danger to humans

Cholecalciferol, as with any toxic material must be handled with care. An excessive amount of cholecalciferol is hazardous though it is less toxic to humans than many other poisons used for possum control.

Contact the National Poisons Centre for more information 0800 764 766.

Danger to dogs and cats

Cholecalciferol is toxic to dogs and cats. They are susceptible to poisoning from eating baits directly. Dogs and cats are less susceptible to poisoning from eating poisoned carcasses as the dying possum breaks down the poison. However, poisoned carcasses still pose a risk if a dog eats several carcasses.

If you suspect a dog has eaten poison or dead animals try to induce vomiting and take the animal to a vet immediately. A vet can administer a special treatment to counter the poisoning action.

Why do we use Cholecalciferol?

Cholecalciferol in high doses acts by elevating blood calcium levels, causing heart failure. Possums and rodents have a low tolerance to calcium, which makes them particularly sensitive to this type of toxin.

Cholecalciferol 0.8% (8g per kg) or Vitamin D3 occurs naturally in sources such as fortified milk, fish liver oils, butter, egg yolk and liver.

Animals poisoned with cholecalciferol show loss of appetite, reduced body weight and elevated calcium concentrations in blood and tissue. Possums die in four to seven days. 

Decal picture for signs

Decal bait bag 30g and Decal pellets loose