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Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara committee members

http://www.gw.govt.nz/whaitua-te-whanganui-a-tara-committee-members

Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara committee members

Updated 28 February 2020 10:04am

Meet the Whaitua Te-Whanganui-a-Tara committee members:

Louise Askin
Committee Co-Chair
Roger Blakeley 
Ros Connelly Quentin Duthie 
Wayne Guppy
Tui Lewis
Peter Matcham
Zoe Ogilvie
Jonny Osborne
Anya Pollock
Kara Puketapu-Dentice
Committee Co-Chair

Hikitia Ropata
Sean Rush Naomi Solomon
Gabriel Tupou
Pat van Berkel

Get in touch with us to give us your thoughts. You can reach us at whaitua@gw.govt.nz. To see what we have been doing visit our Facebook page, and to share what you value about our water and your solutions, visit Have Your Say.

Louise Askin

 Louise Askin - Committee Co-Chair

Kia ora koutou, I’m Louise from Makara, and a co-chair of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee. We are a community committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council and our city councils on the future of water quality and its use in Wellington, Upper Hutt and Lower Hutt (our Whaitua).

Our waterways are precious and our water networks (freshwater, wastewater and stormwater) are vital for our community’s wellbeing. Recently, we have been learning about the state of water in our area and gathering community input on how water is valued and what should be done to look after it.

I live with my family beside the Makara Stream and we follow its path each day, winding from the beach up toward the headwaters above Makara Village or Ohariu. Our rural communities value their waterways and we want their input on how to best achieve reductions of sediment and pathogens in our rural areas.

In town, there is a huge job ahead in upgrading the piped water networks and lessening our three cities’ impact on water quality - while also planning for population growth. Our region must meet national water quality requirements within a few years so we want to find solutions that reflect our communities’ views and are informed by good evidence and information.

 

Louise Askin

 Roger Blakeley

Kia ora koutou, I am Roger Blakeley and I represent the Greater Wellington Regional Council on the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee, which was set up by the Regional Council to make recommendations for the future of freshwater quality and use in Wellington and the Hutt Valley.

We are looking forward to working with you to shape the water future of our Whaitua Te Whanganui- a-Tara Hutt Valley Wellington Harbour. Our population is growing fast and placing more pressure on waste water and stormwater infrastructure. We need your help to protect the health and mauri of our waterways for us and for our children. 

Fixing the waste water and stormwater infrastructure is costly. These are big changes, and needs to reflect our communities’ views, informed by good evidence and information to find solutions that are fair and equitable.

 

 Ros Connelly 

Councillor Ros Connelly’s principal place of residence is the Te Awa Kairangi ki Uta/Upper Hutt Constituency. Ros is a trained scientist and holds a Master of Public Management from Victoria University. She has mostly worked in public service and was elected to the Upper Hutt City Council in 2016. She was elected to the Greater Wellington Regional Council in 2019 and is the deputy Chair of GW's Environment Committee. She is a mother of two and has spent a lot of time dedicated to the community level governance of early childcare centres, kid’s sports teams and schools. Ros is passionate about ensuring the sustainable use of our natural resources, promoting women’s leadership and participation in decision-making, and creating buildings, services and environments that are inclusive and accessible to all people. She believes a priority for GWRC is protecting our river and water, including taking action on water uses such as bottling.

 

 Quentin Duthie

Kia ora koutou, I am Quentin, a member of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and how our water is used. Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them are precious taonga, so we have set out to understand how they are valued and what should be done to provide the future we want for our water.

To me, this Whaitua project is a journey where we can apply our experience and values, and develop a vision that enhances the mana of the whenua, the tangata whenua and the whole community.  

We need you to be part of our journey on the Whaitua Project. This is a journey to improve the health and mauri of our waterways, we need to fix our waste and stormwater network.  These are big changes, and needs to reflect our communities’ views informed by good evidence and information.

 

 Wayne Guppy

Kia ora koutou, I am Wayne Guppy, mayor Upper Hutt City Council, and a member of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and how our water is used.

Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them are precious taonga, so we have set out to understand how they are valued and what should be done to provide the future we want for our water.

The importance of the environment, Hutt River and our waterways are important to me and critical to the well-being of current and future generations. We are looking forward to working with you to maintain and improve the quality of the water in our catchments. We need to fix our waste and stormwater infrastructure with population growth putting more pressure on our pipe networks. I need your help to find solutions that are equitable and fair.

 

 Tui Lewis

Kia ora koutou, I am Tui Lewis and I represent the Hutt City Council on the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee, set up by the Greater Wellington Regional Council to make recommendations for maintaining and improving our taonga – our fresh and coastal waters.

I am honoured to have the privilege of serving Te Awakarangi and to support the kaitiakitanga of our special environment with the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara committee. We are looking forward to working with you to maintain and improve the quality of the water in our catchments. Growing population is placing an immense pressure on our waste and stormwater pipes. We need to fix our infrastructure to leave a healthier catchment to our children, and fixing infrastructure is costly.

These are big changes, and needs to reflect our communities’ views informed by good evidence and information to find solutions that are fair and equitable.

 

 Peter Matcham

Kia ora koutou, I’m Pete, a member of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and how our water is used. Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them are precious taonga, so we have set out to understand how they are valued and what should be done to provide the future we want for our water.

My wife and I have been living at the edge of Belmont Park for over 30 years and I consider it my responsibility to pass on a sustainable healthy catchment to my grandchildren. We can’t do this alone and need your help in protecting the health and mauri of our water. 

Increasing population and changing land use is putting pressure on our water, from our rivers and streams to the supply of drinking water, and management of storm and waste water. Fixing these problems is going to cost a lot, and we need to find solutions that are fair and equitable based on sound evidence and knowledge.

To do this we need to understand your views and to work with you and your community. Let’s shape the future of this place and our precious freshwater together.

 

 Zoe Ogilvie

Kia ora koutou, I’m Zoe, a member of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and importantly, on how our water is used. Our waterways and the life they support are important to lots of people, and I want to understand what you think should be done to make sure future generations are able to enjoy and protect our freshwater. 

We need your help in protecting the health and mauri of our waterways, which are under pressure from increasing population. We need solutions that require real change in the way we interact with water if we want it to be safe for our kids. And we need to think long-term about how and who pays for these solutions. 

 

 Jonny Osborne

Kia ora koutou, I am Johnny, a Wellington resident since 2000. I am a member of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and how our water is used. Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them are precious taonga, so we have set out to understand how they are valued and what should be done to provide the future we want for our water.

We want to work with you to make our Whaitua more sustainable and healthy so that the future generations can continue to enjoy the many beautiful parks, rivers, streams and beaches of this catchment.

To leave behind a strong legacy, we need to protect the health and mauri of our waterways, which are under pressure due to population and land development. We need to fix our waste and stormwater infrastructure. These are big changes, and needs to reflect our communities’ views informed by good evidence and information.

 

 Anya Pollock

Kia ora koutou, I am Anya from Karori, a member of Greater Wellington Regional Council’s Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and how our water is used. Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them are precious taonga, so we have set out to understand how they are valued and what should be done to provide the future we want for our water.

The Karori Stream that flows through my backyard serves as a reminder to me every single day on the importance of making our waterways healthy. We need your help in protecting the health and mauri of our waterways, which are under pressure from increasing population. We need solutions that require real change in the way we interact with water if we want it to be safe for our kids. And we need to think long-term about how and who pays for these solutions. 


 Kara Puketapu-Dentice - Committee Co-Chair

Kia ora koutou, I’m Kara, and a co-chair of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and how our water is used. Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them are precious taonga, so we have set out to understand how they are valued and what should be done to provide the future we want for our water. I am also a conduit to Taranaki Whānui mana whenua on the Whaitua Committee.

Raised on our whānau farm in Wanui-o-mata, I have always been involved with supporting iwi in their freshwater projects and treaty settlement processes. As kaitiaki of the taiao, our taonga, it is incumbent upon each of us to preserve the integrity of our environment and way of life. This is a journey to save the health and mauri of our waterways, we need to fix urban water infrastructure and more ways to connect with our Wai.

We need to find solutions that are equitable and fair. Doing nothing is an option with our population growing fast and putting more pressure on our waste and storm water infrastructure.


 Hikitia Ropata

Kia ora koutou, Ko Hikitia Ropata toku ingoa.  He uri Ngāti Toa, Te Ati Awa, Ngāti Raukawa me Ngāti Porou.  I am currently a member of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, how our water is used and who by.

Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them are precious taonga, so we have set out to bring a mana whenua voice to how this precious taonga are valued and to advocate a mana whenua view about what should be done to ensure we build a sustainable future for what we want for our fresh water. I am also a conduit to the Greater Wellington Regional Council’s Te Upoko Taiao (Natural Resources Management Committee) on the Whaitua Committee. 

We are looking forward to working with you to maintain and improve the quality of the water in our catchments. Our population is growing fast and placing more pressure waste and stormwater infrastructure. I need your help to protect the health and mauri of our waterways for us today and for our mokopuna of tomorrow. 

Fixing the waste and stormwater infrastructure is costly. Help us to find solutions that are fair and equitable.  These are big changes, and needs to reflect our communities’ views informed by good evidence and information. 

 

 Sean Rush

Hi, I'm Sean Rush and I am the Portfolio lead for Wellington's '3 waters' and represent the Wellington City Council on the Whaitua Committee.

We have considerable challenges to maintain our current network and be prepared for growth.  Maintaining a balance between delivering affordable, clean and sufficient water must be balanced with ensuring our take does not adversely affect the eco-systems of the relevant waterways or result in environmentally harmful discharges.

 

 Naomi Solomon

Naomi Solomon is the Ngāti Toa representative to Whaitua te Whanganui-a-Tara. She has recently been appointed as the Manager of Resource Management and Communications at Te Rūnanga o Toa Rangatira Inc. Prior to this, she worked as a Senior Policy Analyst at Te Puni Kōkiri where she was responsible for international indigenous rights and intellectual property policy; as a Private Secretary in the Office of the Minister for Māori Development; and at the Ministry for Primary Industries working on Biosecurity and Animal Welfare Regulatory Reform. Naomi has spent a number of years as a Board Member of Te Rūnanga o Toa Rangatira and was the Chairperson of the board’s Audit, Risk and Investment Committee for a number of years. Miss Solomon also served as the Ngāti Toa representative to Te Upoko Taiao, and as a committee member on Te Awarua-o-Porirua Whaitua Committee. She is an experienced policy analyst with a background in Crown-Maori relationships and has experience in iwi governance issues. Naomi has a Bachelor of Law (LLB) and a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and Political Science from Victoria University of Wellington. She is also an alum of the World Intellectual Property Organisation Summer School Programme.

 

 Gabriel Tupou

Gabriel is an active community member serving both as a volunteer and at a governance level who enjoys making a positive impact on people’s lives. An outstanding representative of our Māori and Pasifika communities, he leads through inclusion and respect for others. Gabriel connects with all parts of the community – from youth through to the elderly. He finds his passion for the community to be inspiring and is a constant support for those around him.

“As kaitiaki of the taiao, our taonga, it is incumbent upon each of us to preserve the integrity of our environment and way of life. Being part of the Whaitua Whanganui-a-tara Committee is an opportunity for us to examine the past, present and future of water. And to use that knowledge to influence positive outcomes that will improve the quality and management of water for generations to come,” he says.

 

 Pat van Berkel

Kia ora koutou, I’m Pat, a member of the Whaitua Te Whanganui-a-Tara Committee tasked with making recommendations to Greater Wellington Regional Council on the future of our coastal and freshwater quality, and how our water is used. Our waterways and all the fish and species that live in them are precious taonga, so we have set out to understand how they are valued and what should be done to provide the future we want for our water.

I have had the opportunity to work with some of you through my involvement with Forest & Bird Upper Hutt. I also chair the local group – Friends of the Hutt River. I am passionate about the health of our waterways that should be safe for people to enjoy and would like to see a thriving natural ecology in our waterways.

This job isn’t easy. We need to find solutions to fix our waste and stormwater networks. These are big changes, and needs to reflect our communities’ views informed by good evidence and information.