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Greater Wellington figures show it sure has rained a lot lately

http://www.gw.govt.nz/greater-wellington-figures-show-it-sure-has-rained-a-lot-lately

Greater Wellington figures show it sure has rained a lot lately

Have you got the feeling the rain never stopped this winter? Well, you’re right and Greater Wellington Regional Council has released the figures to prove it. According to council data, rainfall totals across the Greater Wellington region have been breaking records in many areas between January and August this year.

GW’s General Manager Environment Management Group, Nigel Corry, says during winter June was relatively dry but July and August sure made up for it. “Rainfall was actually below average throughout the entire region for June. Paekakariki’s June average was only 5% of normal rainfall. So you can imagine the locals surprise when July rolls around and they then receive than twice as much (220%) average rainfall followed by just over one and half times (162%) above average for August.”

Greater Wellington monitors rainfall at over 50 sites across the region. The information collected is vital for flood-warning, water management during drought, and detecting long-term trends in climate.

Between January and August, the Kapiti Coast area had received the highest amount of rainfall when compared to the long-term average, with totals of 966mm in Otaki and 1181mm in Waikanae – both being 150% of normal and the second highest totals at each location since 1970.

Over the same period, rainfall through Porirua, Wellington, Lower Hutt, Upper Hutt and the Ruamahanga Valley, in the Wairarapa, was around 120% to 130% of average. The eastern Wairarapa hill country saw closer to average rainfall totals from January to August.

Lower Hutt was another area to receive twice its monthly rainfall in July.

“During a storm in the middle of July our flood protection team was nervously watching river levels rises in the Wairarapa and Wainuiomata River. Thankfully the rain eased off before the rivers burst their banks but we had our regional emergency management teams on stand-by ready for the worst,” says Corry.

As for the rest of the year? According to NIWA’s seasonal forecast, the same weather patterns that have brought the Wellington region all this wet weather will most likely be sticking around until November.

Please see regional rainfall statistics below.

 

Percentage of normal rainfall

                 
 

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Jan-Aug

Plimmerton (Whenua Tapu)

101%

120%

253%

322%

84%

12%

170%

199%

140%

Battle Hill

164%

211%

198%

273%

79%

14%

165%

213%

151%

Paparangi

119%

102%

176%

262%

59%

55%

169%

154%

127%

Tawa

119%

102%

176%

262%

59%

55%

169%

154%

127%

                   
                   

Otaki

155%

134%

192%

293%

89%

26%

170%

201%

150%

Waikanae

145%

156%

170%

257%

121%

19%

187%

191%

150%

Paekakariki

143%

189%

237%

229%

78%

5%

220%

162%

137%

Khandallah

112%

170%

183%

283%

67%

60%

161%

140%

138%

Karori Res

82%

110%

146%

227%

64%

79%

160%

150%

122%

Berhampore

99%

257%

222%

284%

98%

66%

181%

140%

154%

Wainuiomata

119%

109%

98%

226%

55%

34%

192%

102%

110%

Kaitoke

188%

191%

143%

261%

73%

41%

123%

145%

131%

Lower Hutt

129%

113%

158%

279%

52%

17%

203%

143%

127%

                   

Tinui

94%

217%

73%

344%

114%

46%

97%

48%

110%

Te Ore Ore (Masterton)

56%

156%

105%

298%

95%

44%

144%

53%

109%

Featherston

78%

232%

129%

262%

81%

43%

137%

108%

127%

Martinborough

90%

216%

141%

301%

103%

37%

184%

109%

136%

Longbush

84%

172%

74%

267%

85%

33%

183%

88%

117%

Waiohine Gorge

110%

232%

92%

237%

86%

44%

128%

127%

137%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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