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Quarries (gravel and shingle extraction)

http://www.gw.govt.nz/quarries-gravel-and-shingle-extraction

Quarries (gravel and shingle extraction)

Updated 8 July 2015 8:47am

The Wellington Region has some excellent sources of gravel and shingle that can be quarried and used for things like road building and general construction. Some of the gravel sources are in the beds of rivers, some are near the coast, and some are inland. Adverse effects of taking gravel and shingle, and breaking it up to useful sizes, include objectionable dust on neighbouring properties, lowering of river beds, and muddying the water in rivers and at the coast.

The Council controls any excavation, drilling, tunnelling, or other disturbance of land

  • in the coastal marine area (below the high tide mark)
  • in the bed of a lake or river
  • on erosion prone land.

If the gravel and shingle extraction is done in the coastal marine area (below the line of mean high water springs) it is controlled in the Regional Coastal Plan.

Gravel and shingle extraction in the beds of lakes and rivers is controlled in the Regional Freshwater Plan.

If you want to extract gravel or shingle from land outside the bed of a river or lake, and inland of the coastal marine area, and it involves large scale soil disturbance on erosion prone land, it is controlled in the Regional Soil Plan. District plans can restrict gravel extraction or quarrying on any land outside river and lakes, so check those plans for any rules.

Discharges of dust to air associated with gravel extraction are controlled in the Regional Air Quality Management Plan unless it's in the coastal marine area, in which case it's controlled in the Regional Coastal Plan.

Gravel or shingle extraction in the coastal marine area

The Regional Coastal Plan contains six rules controlling extraction of gravel from foreshores and the seabed. No sand, shell or shingle can be taken without a coastal permit. If the extraction causes an associated discharge of dust to air, an additional coastal permit is required. The rules apply throughout the coastal marine area.

Within Areas of Significant Conservation Value, gravel and shingle extraction is a non-complying activity controlled by Rule 39 or Rule 43 of the Regional Coastal Plan. Any discharge of dust associated with the activity is a non-complying activity under Rule 72.

Outside Areas of Significant Conservation Value, gravel and shingle extraction is a discretionary activity controlled by Rule 37, or Rule 38, or Rule 40, or Rule 42 of the Regional Coastal Plan, depending on the amount of shingle extracted. Any discharge of dust associated with the activity is a discretionary activity under Rule 72. Dredging less than 300,000 cubic metres of sand, shell or shingle from the Hutt River mouth is a discretionary activity under Rule 41.

Discharges to air associated with gravel and shingle extraction

Rule 23 of the Regional Air Quality Management Plan requires a discharge permit for the discharge of dust and other contaminants to air associated with any extraction, quarrying, and mining of minerals that is part of an industrial or trade process taking place outside the bed of a river. This is a discretionary activity.

Rule 10 of the Regional Air Quality Management Plan permits the discharge of dust and other contaminants to air associated with any extraction, quarrying, and mining of minerals provided the activity is not part of an industrial or trade process and takes place outside the bed of a lake or river.

Discharges to air associated with gravel and shingle extraction inside the bed of a river are not restricted under the Regional Air Quality Management Plan. Any effects on air quality associated with these extractions are controlled in the Regional Freshwater Plan.

Gravel or shingle extraction from the bed of a river or lake

Rule 38 of the Regional Freshwater Plan permits the extraction of up to 15 cubic metres of gravel per year from any river bed, provided the extraction complies with conditions specified in the rule. Up to fifty cubic metres may be extracted if the person taking the gravel owns the river bed.

Rule 49 of the Regional Freshwater Plan requires a land use consent for any extraction of gravel from a river or lake bed if the extraction is not permitted by Rule 38. This is a discretionary activity.

Gravel or shingle extraction not in the coastal marine area and not in the bed of any river or lake

Rule 2 of the Regional Soil Plan requires a land use consent for the disturbance of more than 1,000 cubic metres of gravel, soil etc, on erosion prone land, unless the disturbance is associated with roading or tracking, or is controlled by conditions on a subdivision consent issued by the territorial authority. This is a restricted discretionary activity.

Contact the relevant district or city council for information about gravel and shingle extractions that are not on erosion prone land. See the Kapiti Coast District Plan, the Porirua City District Plan, the Wellington City District Plan, the Hutt City District Plan, the Upper Hutt District Plan, the South Wairarapa District Plan, the Carterton District Plan, or the Masterton District Plan.